20181113

Good stuff to listen to when fixing the socks of strangers around the world (only 5 pairs to go). We had an open studio event on the weekend at ISCP. I was in a flue for the entire event and sat in the corner darning socks. A hipster complemented my stitchwork. He told me I’d make 300$ for a pair!

Anna Tsing & Donna Haraway: Tunneling in the Chthulucene (2015) University of Idaho, Moscow. A long and loose (in good way) presentation of their thinking. Tsing reminds audiences that non-human life does not live in harmony. Symbioses develop trough violence and struggle. Haraway reminds audiences how multicellular entities form: By single cell organisms attempting to eat each others, partially devouring each others bodies, getting stuck and living together anew.

Imagining infrastructures (2017) The British Academy. A (too) detailed talk about infrastructure. Partially good for developing an understanding of infra as a social, life-supporting network. It starts with an interesting analysis of air-conditioners as colonial apparatuses! The idea that people work best in climate controlled cool environments should be re-evaluated. The negative effect that air-conditioners have on communities was addressed in a recent reading group too. Air-conditioners break communities by endorsing indoor, private comfort for closed families. Manuel Tironi’s account on how communities rebuild after catastrophes is very rewarding too. He suggest that infrastructure should be approached as a social network and a compost (as defined by Haraway).

The Facebook Economy (2018) Zero Books podcast. Douglas Lain chatting with Rob Larson. They work their best to frame Facebook (and others) as monopolies and do a good job clearing out how exactly the monopolies make their profits.

WRITING ABOUT ART TODAY MEANS BEING WRITTEN ONTO (2018) Kimmo Modig. Modig is developing a socio-material analysis of contemporary art-exhibition practices. They pleas for a broader acceptance of social practices (workshops etc.) as a critical medium for artistic expression. Social practices and community-building-as-art is a vital field of practice for groups and individuals, who cannot exist alone. Art practices which center on objects & orchestrated performances, advocate exclusive infrastructures. I would like to extend their critique to problematize material & energy demands object centered & orchestrated performance aesthetics rely on. Using Modigs critique we can argue that Chris Burden was more of an antibiotic artist then a performance artist. He was more hospitalized and medicated, then shot in the arm. #ॐ

Modig offers a diagram Social Anxiety Matrix #2 which can be used for analyzing personal motivations for attending art events. They argues that “Contemporary art has never been about class revolution [the temporal and generational rotation of positions of wealth past classes people are born to], but the cementing of its horizontal power structure while adding a new coat of paint on it.” which I don’t agree with. I believe that artist networks and support structures (grants, residencies etc.) are currently the best (if not only) systems for advancing the temporal and generational rotation of wealth and power. Quotes from the text below.

Public has become the primal form of new art, and exhibition the secondary one. The word public here is a (suboptimal) placeholder for assemblies, collectives, public gatherings, non-patriarchal familial constellations and so forth. […] What was once the fringe program (talks, workshops) is now the headliner. When I look around, I can see some people having not really realized this. Others are angry, even. “Why is art about the other stuff nowadays?” This is another way of saying “I”m white and feel like I can’t get enough exposure.”

Managing a nuanced perspective on things is particularly vexing when you’re feeling overwhelmed by the extreme, life-destroying urgency of climate change, for example. Often, you can catch an artist having gone through these motions and realizing that, say, flying to biennials is bad for the environment and a grueling way to live, too. So they turn their own realization into a dictum and hold everyone up to this standard of their own making.

20181109

Today “It is possible…” won over “It is highly unlikely…”.

Social medias that reward clicks, favor exaggeration.

When everything becomes possible, we loose the baseline.

We need to keep the world we share in focus.

Please, quit social medias and start blogging.

I’d love to read what you think.

20181105

I’ve been using Duckduckgo as my search engine for the past two months and it’s working well for me. Today I’m migrating to Firefox. From now on end I’ll be relying on Signal for messaging, Wire for chatting, Firefox for browsing and Little Snitch gives me control over goes out my computer system. Feels good to have more control over my data. How the hell did I end up using Chrome in the first place? It was the 3D demos back in the day, I suppose. I bet Google/Alphabet has already collected enough data of me to create a virtual model of my online behavior. It comforts me that as I change as a human being I’ll slowly slip away from their grasp. So far I haven’t noticed any reduction in speed or significant gaps in information. Everything is working fast and accurately (and more ethically).

Hear William Basinski at an Outpost Artists Resources benefit event. He performed a dreamy, sonic-space exploration trip. The gig was framed as a love story which steered the listening expedience heavily. I couldn’t get very deep into the music, it felt like there was a veil dampening glimmers. His hand hovered over the computer keyboard throughout the gig but I don’t think he touched it. There were some participants of the the Lorre-Mill uTone building workshop present and we got to share notes on the experience, which felt rewarding.

We interviewed Agnes Denes during the weekend with Johannes Heldén. We had a pleasant chat (a citation from it below). Also found a MANIFESTO (1970) of hers online.

It’s so easy to kill a concept. Especially a benign concept. It’s not so easy to kill a bad concept. Its not so easy to kill an evil concept. It’s much easier to kill a good and a nice concept.

20181101

I won the ISCP Halloween costume contest. Residents were tasked to dress up as famous artists or artwork. I immediately knew how to win the competition. My art education was basically 6+ years of faking to be famous artist or artwork.

20181030

Build a special “3,5mm TRS jack” to “dual banana jack” adapter (with additional female pin headers for grounding the connection). The TRS jack has two pairs of wires coming from it. Both pairs transport a signal (Tip or Ring) and the ground (the sleeve of the 3,5mm jack). The signals (Tip/Ring) go directly to the banana jacks and the ground (Sleeve) is connected to a set of female pin headers, which I glued on the outer plastic shells of the banana jacks.

I added 3 pin female headers to my Lorre-Mill uTone “prototyping area” which connect to the ground (the negative terminal of the DC power connector -> to the negative terminal of the battery). When using the adapter the ground connection can be made using a jumper wire. I’ve used the adapter to connect the uTone with a Bastl Kastl unit. Kastl can send out control voltages via a TRS female connector on the back of the device. It can send out an LFO, random sequencer voltages, gate pulses, etc. Signals can be routed from the top of the device to the left (Tip) and right (Ring) channels (Should there be resistors inside the adaptor?).

I can now sequence the pitch of the uTone and send other kinds of voltages to it’s other input. Sending a gate signal to the input in the middle of the board introduces pretty rhythmic distortions. The only weird behaviour I can identify is that the uTone produces lower tones when powered from an adaptor and more high pitch sound when a battery is used. This might be due to the Kastl, the voltage might drop when it’s grounded. I imagine the connector will work the same with a softPop.

Works well and looks cute.