Cute short on the state of affairs between Art & Politics: Best Friends Forever (2017) by Liu Shiyuan and Kristian Mondrup.

Revisiting Greener Grass (2010) by Mari Keski-Korsu. Today the work is even more relevant.

Visited Arttu Merimaas’ Grandfather’s Leather Club exhibition at Sinne gallery. It is great. Thanks to the Cruel Radiance… course we hosted I got an updated view to his art and with this insight the exhibition felt like a warm handshake. The pieces were critically materialistic but optimistic. Instead of making crude suggestions (as seen in the Autochthonic Fantasy) he displayed queer fearytail aesthetics with faint references to public monuments in Helsinki. There were horse pictures too! After Sinne I visited Hippolyte for Pekka Niskanen & Robert Aeberhard Sounds That Shouldn’t Be There. I read it as a sacrifice on the grave of modernism.


I’m happy to see the world burn. In 2002 I made a watercolour for my friend Kalle Salonen in celebration of the end of his military service (and short career as army staff). I wrote a poem into the picture too. The poem speaks of a wall which is being build. It will cover the world and we’ll be caught inside. Towards the end people will gather around faint fires, which will warm us like wetting our pants. Donald Trump’s presidency will change what is understood as “a Trumpet”. Brassy music for our last post.

Met with “The Cruel Radiance of What Is” course teacher crew (Arttu&Miina and Mikko) to finalise our schedules and plans. The course is build in a poetic tone. The educational acts we’ll engage with the students resemble performance art pieces. Instead of pumping students with facts or developing specific creative skills, participants will be invited to think about “stuff” which inspires them and build artistic agency in relation and about “stuff”.

“As part of the modern capitalist society music is in danger of perishing in random samples, data, markets, instrumentation patterns, institutions and computer nets, or of suffocating in the gigantic tautological machinery of the media industry, that continuously sends back the opinions of the masses, that they, as media, formulated.We need music that is the differential, that neither compromises or thinks of surrender, but carries on even in the shadow and disguise like the guerrilla fighters and draws active disappearing lines in the fields of society. We need music that is a labyrinth, a rich ensemble of relations; diversity, heterogeneity, breaks, unexpected links and long monotonies. It is the vision of a life that opens the ways and allows the horizon of resistance to light up.”

Writes Dror Feiler in MUSIC, SOUNDS, GARBAGE, NOISE and POLITICS post from 2009.


Burning Man at Google lecture by Fred Turner explains how companies like Google foster (and capitalize) creativity and a sense of community using architecture, mailing lists and other nasty schemes. Turner argues that engineers and coders are the primus motors of social change and culture (like artists and poets were in the past). The talk makes it easier to understand what artist/facilitators like Andrew Gryf Paterson are after with their work- and talkshop activities. Technology (and art) is a tool for social (re)organization. It is made and used to express desires. The talk also discusses the growing role of self-reliance (and how survivalism is related to it). “Vocational ecstasy” (Ideological work) is also an interesting concept. It describes a creative mode people can arrive to when working in teams on creative tasks. Individual egos fade away through joined unpaid labor and participants feel transferred something else (work on modular technology is key in the experience).

I’ve been trying to motivate myself into editing Horse Porsche Show documentations I shot with Hanna. Also contacted the Workhorse hobbyist association in regards of their winter forestering workshops. Trans-Horse activities are progressing slowly and I’m having trouble with setting goals for next years activities. The funding I’ve managed to accumulate is not adequate for building collaboratory schemes together with professionals in the horse-community. Making mere representations (videos, texts etc.) of their work and horses feels boring.. Particularly as the reception of our “Come Together, Leave Together” (2015) movie was so lame (We didn’t get it into any festival screenings in Finland and it’s been rejected from the YLE (Uusi kino) programming too). We got positive reviews from peers and horse culture collaborators but the movie has failed to reach audiences through mainstream channels.

Alex Schweder continuing on Performance Architecture (lecture).


Visited an exhibition after-party at the Ingredients-space over the weekend. The event was a celebration of Irina Korina’s work (On display at Alkovi) and hosted by Arttu Merimaa & Miina Hujala. Saw Paula and had a pleasant chat with Arash Moori a sound artist who is working at HIAP. We exchanged notes on the experience of playing music live and how sometimes one can get the feeling that there is something (or someone) extra inside the sound.

Today I participated “Kollab talkshop on local activism” event at M-Cult. Riikka Kuoppala & Thomas Martin presented their Maunula-movie project, Mikko Lipiäinen gave a short overview of the Transformative Pulp project (which I’m a big fan of) and Emilia Palonen talked about local democracy developments in relation to the Maunula-house.

Made videos for the upcoming performativity lecture:


​An incredibly cynical video detailing the future of urban life and warfare made by the American military complex: Megacities: Urban Future, the Emerging Complexity

A nifty text on cultural imperialism by Pilvi Porkola What is ‘esitys’ on the University of Arts “How to do things with performance?” project blog. She is critical about Richard Schechner’s “Performance Studies. Introduction” which I’ve been studying in preparation of our upcoming Art School Maa course. 

I should make a kettlebell out of Snellman’s head. 

Visited SIC 2 gallery spaces opening exhibition The movement that didn’t have a dog and a stick… The exhibition was curated by Mikko Kuorinki and Diego Bruno who have been working together on a project they call Ruler. My favorite work was “Joycean Society” (2013) by Dora García. In discussion with Topi Äikäs I came into the conclusion that the exhibition was fuelled with sincere trust for the arts. Topi and I had difficulty in participating in the feeling because we know that the production of such exhibitions is always messy. Messiness is the opposite of Accountability. I have trouble trusting mess (even if I know that art is at it’s best as mess). 

We chatted about the 9/11 events in USA. Topi gave an honest account on how he felt after hearing about the attacks. His honesty cleansed the air and I suddenly remembered feeling suppressed delight. At the time we had been both excited about seeing the imperialists twin towers collapse and celebrated the attacks against the high standing symbols of global capitalism.


If I’ve understood “Situated Knowledges: […]” by Donna Haraway correctly, she claims provocatively that the ones oppressed by the system do not understand the system better than the oppressors (I believe she’s arguing in this manner in an effort to motivate women into engaging with “hard-sciences”).

“To see from below is neither easily learned or unproblematic, even if ‘we’ ‘naturally’ inhabit the great underground terrain of subjugated knowledges. […] The standpoints of the subjugated are not ‘innocent’ positions. […] ‘Subjugated’ standpoints are preferred because they seem to promise more adequate, sustained, objective, transforming accounts of the world. But how to see from below is a problem requiring at least as much skill with bodies and language, with the mediations of vision, as the ‘highest’ technoscientific visualizations.”

Derrida insisted that all human codes and cultural expressions are “writing” and that everything can be understood as text. This means that bodies bashing against structures and seeking affordances, are in fact “reading” our culture. From this perspective the ones that are exposed to the violence of our system have more access to to it’s structures! Do victims understand crimes better than criminals?

Interesting video Black Market International Documentary (2005).


Alex Schweder discusses “Performance Architecture” (.pdf). “In 2009, after a decade in the gallery, I began Its Form Will Follow Your Performance at Magnus Muller Berlin, a project that used the gallery as a point of departure but extended into the homes of ordinary Berliners. As a way of starting a renovation, I would meet interested parties at a desk in the gallery. Here, we talked about their apartment for about an hour. […] Our session would conclude with us agreeing on a new way that they would perform their house. This could be as simple as moving a plant into the hall during winter and not bringing it back in or sitting on the roof thinking about potential”.

He cites Trisha Browns work.  I found her dances on youtube and liked Accumulation (1971). Watermotor (1978) is boring but the slow motion effect is inspirational. Schweder presents one of the structures he’s made with Ward Shelly on a video.

Also found the movie on Conical Intersect (1975) by Gordon Matta-Clark.


Preparing for the Art School Maa: “The Cruel Radiance of What Is” course which we’ll host together with Miina Hujala, Arttu Merimaa and Mikko Kuorinki. Updating my approaches to performativity.

Performative acts against precarity!: “There is no freedom that is not it’s exercise. Freedom is not a potential that waits for its exercise. It comes into being through its exercise”. A brilliant talk by Judith Butler – From Performativity to Precarity. The talk also gives a glimpse on what kind of worker’s right issues will emerge in Europe as a result of the refugee situation: “How does the unspeakable population speak and make its claims?”.