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Talked and played waters at Kiilan äänipäivät. I had a wonderful time, stayed up way too late and made new friends. I enjoyed all the performances. Particularly liked Ahti & Ahti (perfectly lowercase guitar tremors) and .oO ensembles interpenetration of the four scores they had commissioned. Out of these a poem by Pauliina Haasjoki was my favourite and I also liked Leena Kelas piece titled “Ode to Soil and Elegy for Extinction”. In their interpretation the ensemble focused on distance, perhaps to draw emphasis to our experiences of the phenomenon of extinction. The performers were really far (across the wheat field) from the audience. Three small black dots in a vast plane. They begun executing the score but what they actually performed was impossible to see or hear. Suddenly they produced a lot of noise banging metal barrels and right after a sound clip of generic audience applause was played. The clip was treated with a phaser effect and slowly morphed into a squarewave bleep. This amplified our the distance to the performers. The field felt like a stadium concert. From a far the loud noises they had performed were effected by the wind and atmospheric gasses, which made the noise they produced wavery. Phaser effect morphing to squarewave was a nice discovery. The score for the piece (revealed later at an after party at Kiilojentalo where we hear two compositions by Pauline Oliveros, interpreted by the Truckfuckers) was very detailed and revealed that the drumming segment was produced from the prompt “AIM FOR JOYFUL CACOPHONY”.

I performed with the Kiila village spring (60.2372, 22.8633) which is a plentiful water source that produces drinking water for the village. It is situated between two fields (wheat and rye) and produces a small creek heading towards the sea. The spring opening is protected with five big concrete rims (covered by a plastic lid) and the enormous overflow (from under the rims) was covered by willows. Roope said the spring has a chalky taste… I think there was clay in it too. I think there were over 50 audience members and I had to use the full range of my voice to be heard. Felt messianic to shout next to a flowing creek. Water Lab (version 2) operated very well using batteries. I chained two lantern 6v’s (for 12v) to power the VC122 Gieskes which produced a small water jet by interpreting the amplitude of the voices the system produced (I’m pushing my usb power supply to ~410mA! and the only error is occational drops in the output when there is no signal). I polished my diy allflesh pads before the gig, felt like a proper way to prepare (also made a special t&r unit). I passed the map which the director of the Kurkijoki village museum drew us to the audience but I didn’t receive it back. The revolutionary dance poses and stretches were well received and the entire audience partook in my efforts. Being inspired by the The French Revolution, Pt. 1 & 2 podcasts by SRSLY WRONG I added French revolutionary poses to the mix. They worked great as bodies are off balanced and facial expressions amplified. See the statue for the French Revolution in Maubeuge as an example. The legs are arched back and if the riffle would be changed to a guitar the pose could be from a stadium gig. The revolutionary stretches feels like a worthy physical activity to explore further (also reminds me of Shadow Boxing Revolution, 2010).

Handed out a few copies of our (by Tea Andreoletti, Thomas Berra & me) Tasting book which is now released as a part of Museum of Contemporary Art Toronto’s Shift Key: Protection Spells program curated by Native Art Department International (Jason Lujan and Maria Hupfield). Bundled the booklet with a plastic knife which the audience could use to tear the sheets open and to perform one of the recipes in the book (also had some Sriracha sauce available). Tasting is the process of comparing two or more ingredients to each other (2021) is available for view for two weeks (and after this on youtube).

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